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  1.  
    I'm not asking which is better, because this forum's answer is very obvious.

    I'm asking what the fucking difference is between the two.

    It has been said that metal came into itself with Tony Iommi, and, while I certainly agree, Sabbath does not sound TOO different from a majority of rock from the period. I've heard their usual trio (Paranoid, War Pigs, and Iron Man) played on classic rock radios quite a bit, so that at least means that the general public views them as tame enough to play on the radio. I do consider them metal I suppose, but they find the perfect balance between dark and bright melodies, knowing when to be fast and when to be slow, and rarely being "intense". They're also just fucking phenomenal.

    So why are other bands that most would consider "rock" sometimes called metal? You hear Van Halen, ACDC, and Zeppelin played on classic rock radios all the damn time, but they have had the label of metal tossed their way quite a few times.

    Personally, I think that metal is different from rock solely in its atmosphere and the fact that it may sound "dark" to varying extents.

    A perfect example of something bordering on the edge of rock and metal - at least to me - is Motorhead. They are fast as hell, loud as shit, and nasty as fuck, but they're nothing more than a "good time" band with no inkling of darkness or extreme heaviness in them (at least up through 1983, because, as far as I'm concerned, they did get a bit too metal when they put out Orgasmatron). A track like "The Chase is Better Than the Catch" is essentially ACDC with louder volume, faster riffing, more unabashed grit, and less melodic/musical touch.

    To me, metal really separated from rock in the 80's. Iron Maiden, as good and melodic as they are, cannot be called rock (at least not with Dickinson), yet they aren't nearly as separated from the genre as bands like Metallica, Slayer, and Megadeth are.

    I simply cannot see how the hilariously over the top crapfest known as thrash metal can be put in the same category as Black Sabbath.

    I don't mean to offend anyone, but this question has irked me for a while and I have no other way to put it.

    Thoughts?
    •  
      AC/DC rock music: Inferno
    • May 23rd 2019 edited
     
    I think you're both worrying too much about it and digging for something that is not stationary (static).

    The terms change their meaning over time as new bands and new sounds arrive. What metal was in the 70's is not what metal is today.

    On top of that you have the words themselves. There is a difference between rock n roll and just plain rock, or heavy metal and metal. And then there are all the sub genres. Hard rock, classic rock, melodic rock, glam rock, indie rock, AOR, grunge, thrash metal, death metal, NWBHM, and on and on and on.

    My local "rock" station has had a "metal shop" show for many years. Back in the day that maybe meant Guns N Roses and Faith No More. Then it became Metallica and Megadeth. Now it's stuff that I don't even recognize.

    So to answer your question, the difference between rock and metal...? Attitudes and degrees.
  2.  
    ^ This excellent documentary should answer your question:

  3.  
    How I see, there is rock and roll, (hard) rock and metal.
    Rock and roll is a feeling about (personal) freedom, being young and careless, enjoying life or recognizing its flaws and expressing emotions about all these things. It uses an universal language, for example my dad doesn't speak English but he likes 'Girl's got rhythm' because he says he can feel how much they enjoy it.

    Metal is loud noi... music about things are are considered as manly or brutal, sometimes dark. So for example poverty or war in third world countries is a topic which is alien to a rock and roll group (except for the unlikely situation where the members have personally experienced it) but from a metal band it is quite common because their sound tries to illustrate the atmosphere of war.

    Hard rock is between the two.
    •  
      AC/DC rock music: Rikha
    • May 24th 2019
     
    Posted By: InfernoI think you're both worrying too much about it and digging for something that is not stationary (static).

    The terms change their meaning over time as new bands and new sounds arrive. What metal was in the 70's is not what metal is today.

    On top of that you have the words themselves. There is a difference between rock n roll and just plain rock, or heavy metal and metal. And then there are all the sub genres. Hard rock, classic rock, melodic rock, glam rock, indie rock, AOR, grunge, thrash metal, death metal, NWBHM, and on and on and on.

    My local "rock" station has had a "metal shop" show for many years. Back in the day that maybe meant Guns N Roses and Faith No More. Then it became Metallica and Megadeth. Now it's stuff that I don't even recognize.

    So to answer your question, the difference between rock and metal...? Attitudes and degrees.

    Great reply!
  4.  
    As a guitar player since about 84 here's my take: rock has a simple blues or pentatonic element to it and/or open chords. It's got a more "open" feel. Metal is about palm-muting power chords with a "tight" crunchy feel. In metal, they don't really let chords ring out with sustain so they "chime." Some metal like Kill "Em All uses pentatonic blues even in the riffing by they don't have the big open chords; it's all crunchy. Plus, there's the drum beat: rock has a simple swing to it, metal does not, and is often more concerned with speed and complexity. When Metallica does let chords ring out, they're often still two-finger power chords (can't comment on their Load era as I wrote it off as bullshit) but it does kinda make it a little more rock than other thrash bands.

    That's why classic Motorhead is heavy rock to me: pentatonic, blues, and some open chords. And that's why Megadeth is not. Why I dig Accept more than Slayer, even though I like me some Slayer (in small doses).

    Or, you can even see in some extreme metal bands that add these elements and it's not truly rock but has that element. That's what I dig more as I get older from my metal: bigger, open chords that ring out and chime at times. The older I get, I'd rather hear The Cult's Love album than God Hates Us All.

    My $0.2.
  5.  
    Here's an example of extreme metal that still has a rock element to me. Is it rock? Hell no, but it has a cool rock element that makes me think of Motorhead on even more and harder drugs. Give it a chance to the end and don't get turned off by the vocals if you can. I think once you accept the vocals it has a killer groove:

  6.  
    Posted By: InfernoI think you're both worrying too much about it and digging for something that is not stationary (static).

    The terms change their meaning over time as new bands and new sounds arrive. What metal was in the 70's is not what metal is today.

    On top of that you have the words themselves. There is a difference between rock n roll and just plain rock, or heavy metal and metal. And then there are all the sub genres. Hard rock, classic rock, melodic rock, glam rock, indie rock, AOR, grunge, thrash metal, death metal, NWBHM, and on and on and on.

    My local "rock" station has had a "metal shop" show for many years. Back in the day that maybe meant Guns N Roses and Faith No More. Then it became Metallica and Megadeth. Now it's stuff that I don't even recognize.

    So to answer your question, the difference between rock and metal...? Attitudes and degrees.
    I suppose it is all relative to the band. Hell, more like the album. As time went on, they seemed to blend together more and more until something new is formed.

    Posted By: Bedlam_in_TorontoAs a guitar player since about 84 here's my take: rock has a simple blues or pentatonic element to it and/or open chords. It's got a more "open" feel. Metal is about palm-muting power chords with a "tight" crunchy feel. In metal, they don't really let chords ring out with sustain so they "chime." Some metal like Kill "Em All uses pentatonic blues even in the riffing by they don't have the big open chords; it's all crunchy. Plus, there's the drum beat: rock has a simple swing to it, metal does not, and is often more concerned with speed and complexity. When Metallica does let chords ring out, they're often still two-finger power chords (can't comment on their Load era as I wrote it off as bullshit) but it does kinda make it a little more rock than other thrash bands.

    That's why classic Motorhead is heavy rock to me: pentatonic, blues, and some open chords. And that's why Megadeth is not. Why I dig Accept more than Slayer, even though I like me some Slayer (in small doses).

    Or, you can even see in some extreme metal bands that add these elements and it's not truly rock but has that element. That's what I dig more as I get older from my metal: bigger, open chords that ring out and chime at times. The older I get, I'd rather hear The Cult's Love album than God Hates Us All.

    My $0.2.
    Ah. Rock has more room to breathe, and gives you the “hardness” in doses. Interesting evaluation, and hence why Ace of Spades is different than Inferno.
  7.  
    Definitions change from time to time. In the 70's harder rock like AC/DC, Purple and even Hendrix could be called metal. Today they're just hard rock. I believe the early 80's metal is still considered the blue print for what is old school heavy metal to most people: Maiden, Priest, Saxon etc. What I can't understand though is why AC/DC fans always wipes off the metal tag when speaking of AC/DC. Surely DDDDC and HV aren't metal by today's definition, but I'd be interested to hear from someone with musical knowledge what makes FTATR, BiB and FOTS differ from metal? To me they've got it all: high-pitched intense vocals, power chords, and some dark lyrics (obviously not all of them, but not all of Sabbath's or Saxon's lyrics were dark either).
    •  
      AC/DC rock music: Janonen
    • Jun 1st 2019
     
    Beaten by Toronto, was about to suggest that metal tends to have the guitars with the blues more or less stripped off.
    •  
      AC/DC rock music: Inferno
    • Jun 3rd 2019 edited
     
    "Here are the new (and recent) metal releases for the week of June 2nd to June 8th, 2019. Release reflect proposed North American scheduling, if available. Expect to see most of these albums on shelves or distros on Fridays."

    http://www.invisible...
    •  
      AC/DC rock music: Inferno
    • Jul 1st 2019
     
    No thanks. Hasn't the death metal voice run it's course? Everybody is a copycat now, and nothing sounds original. Although I will say that dude from "Tallah" has insanity going for him.

  8.  
    Posted By: InfernoNo thanks. Hasn't the death metal voice run it's course? Everybody is a copycat now, and nothing sounds original. Although I will say that dude from "Tallah" has insanity going for him.

    Jesus fuck. The 2nd one is at least entertaining comedy